Review: Jackson’s Honest Potato Chips (And My Favorite Dip Recipe!)

This is NOT a sponsored post. All opinions are my own.

I’m a firm believer that even when you’re eating well, you should make room for a treat every now and again.

I think that’s why one of my favorite Instagrammers lately has been Lex Daddio (@restoring_radiance). She eats a lot of clean, healthy food, but she’s not afraid to throw in an occasional doughnut (“good for the soul,” she says). Here’s the caption that accompanied a delicious-looking photo of a chocolate almond croissant:

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Like Lex, I have gone through phases of crazy restriction. They never end well. That’s why this time, I am determined to find balance. Rather than say I’ll never eat my favorite treats again, I will find the best versions of those treats and then enjoy them in moderation.

Starting with potato chips.

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$2.99 per bag at Thrive Market

I picked up two bags of Jackson’s Honest purple heirloom potato chips in my last Thrive Market order. The company has a really inspiring story, and the chips only have three ingredients: purple heirloom potatoes, organic coconut oil, and sea salt. Of course, the fact that they only contain three ingredients isn’t all that surprising. Even Lay’s classic potato chips only have three ingredients: potatoes, vegetable oil (sunflower, corn, and/or canola oil), and salt. But I’m not only concerned with the NUMBER of ingredients, but the QUALITY of those ingredients.

There is a lot of conflicting information out there regarding the healthiest cooking oils, but based on everything I’ve read, I believe coconut oil is a better choice for high-heat applications like deep frying because it is more stable than vegetable oils and therefore does not break down and form free radicals. Here are a few links that further explain what I’m talking about:

Mercola: Infographic (Healthiest Cooking Oil)

Bulletproof: The Best Fats for Bulletproof Cooking

Healthline: Healthiest Oil for Deep Frying

Health considerations aside, I’m not always a fan of coconut oil’s flavor. I just don’t feel like my scrambled eggs need a taste of the tropics, ya feel me? But I was pleasantly surprised to find that the Jackson’s Honest chips taste more of potatoes and salt than they do of coconuts.

Overall, I’d give them a 4.5 out of 5. They’re kind of pricey and, because of the coconut oil, they don’t taste exactly like “regular” potato chips. Still, they’re a good substitute made using quality ingredients like the ones that I would use at home.

The company offers several varieties, including sweet potato, tortilla, and good old-fashioned sea salt, but I think the purple heirloom ones are extra fun:

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I’ve only eaten these on their own so far, but I think they would be even better paired with a tasty dip, so I’m sharing my all-time favorite dip recipe (discovered on Pinterest). If you like what you see, please click the Pinterest logo at the top or bottom of the page to see more of the delicious things I pin.

French Onion Dip from Food, Folks, and Fun

Homemade-French-Onion-Dip-Recipe

This recipe is out-of-this world good. It tastes like an upgraded version of the classic sour cream + onion soup mix dip I grew up eating, but it only contains real food ingredients:

  • 5 Tablespoons butter
  • 4 cups yellow onion, chopped fine
  • salt and pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ⅓ cup water
  • 1½ Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2½ cups sour cream
  • chopped chives, for garnish (optional)
Click the link above the photo for the full recipe and instructions. You won’t be sorry.
What is your go-to dip recipe? Tell me about it in the comments!

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